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How your gut wellbeing affects your happiness

Bacteria are microorganisms found everywhere on Earth, including inside our bodies. In fact, our bodies are inhabited by trillions of bacteria found in various parts, such as the skin, mouth, intestines, and vagina, among others.

Although the relationship between bacteria and happiness isn't entirely clear, there is evidence of a connection between the microbiome (the collection of microorganisms that inhabit our bodies) and our emotional state. Certain intestinal bacteria have been shown to affect mood, anxiety, and depression.

For example, it has been discovered that bacteria of the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium genera, which are common in some fermented foods and probiotic supplements, can improve mood and reduce anxiety and depression in some cases. Furthermore, intestinal bacteria can produce certain chemicals, such as gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and serotonin, which are involved in mood regulation.

On the other hand, it is proven that happiness and positive emotions can impact the microbiome. Chronic stress and depression have been shown to disrupt the bacterial balance in the gut, which can contribute to health issues such as inflammation and autoimmune diseases.

Intestinal Well-being and Emotion

Intestinal well-being is essential for our overall health and well-being, and it has been demonstrated to be closely related to our emotions and mood. The intestine is a vital organ that plays a crucial role in digestion and nutrient absorption. It also houses a large number of bacteria and other microorganisms that form the intestinal microbiome.

The intestinal microbiome is involved in the production of neurotransmitters, such as serotonin and dopamine, which are important for mood regulation and emotional responses. In fact, most of the serotonin in our body is produced in the intestine, not in the brain, as previously thought.

When the intestinal microbiome is imbalanced, it can impact neurotransmitter production, affecting our mood and emotions. For example, intestinal dysbiosis (an imbalance in the composition of intestinal microbiota) has been linked to mental health issues such as anxiety and depression.

Additionally, stress and negative emotions can also affect the intestine and the intestinal microbiome. Chronic stress can alter intestinal permeability and trigger inflammation, increasing the risk of health problems like autoimmune diseases and digestive disorders.

Therefore, it is important to take care of our intestine and intestinal microbiome to promote emotional and mental well-being. Some ways to do this include maintaining a healthy, high-fiber diet, consuming probiotics and fermented foods, managing stress through techniques like meditation and regular exercise, and paying attention to our mental and emotional health.

Regarding recommended probiotics, an ideal option is Inner Cure from Matcha & CO. Developed with microbiome experts, Inner Cure supports your digestive system, immune system, and mood. Our formula is designed for bloating, intestinal discomfort, intestinal flora, and defenses.

It contains 5 probiotic strains with 50 billion CFUs (colony-forming units) per gram of specific probiotics to support the intestinal microbiome. Matcha, a natural prebiotic, helps probiotics survive and adapt to your body. Tryptophan, in combination with matcha and probiotics, promotes your mood.

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